The novel consists of subplots that presented through its protagonist Karim Amir ‘s point of view

The novel consists of subplots that presented through its protagonist Karim Amir ‘s point of view. It mainly depicts the maturation theme, Karim’s quest from childhood to adulthood.
The Buddha tells the story of Karim, 17 years teenage with hybrid identity, passes long journey to find himself a place in the post-colonial Britain in London in the 1970s. The novel is divided into two parts.
In the first part of the novel, Kureishi presents Karim’s family, neighbours and friends and how they struggle to survive as immigrants from British ex-colony ( India ). The main event in this part is when his father Haroon becomes a Buddhist Guide, the point that makes him fascinated with Mrs Eva Kay. This part ends with Haroon’s divorce with Karim’s mother Margeret and engages with Mrs Kay. Haroon, Karim, Eva Kay and her son Charlie who is blooming as a rock star move, and gets a new life and experiences in London.
In the second part, Karim moves on his journey, meets new people from different backgrounds struggles to find himself and his own road to fame that begins when he takes the theatre opportunity that Eva offers. Eva’s friend Jeremy Shadwell casts him as Mowgli in a play that is adapting Rudyard’s Kipling’s The Jungle Book to the stage. Karim especially enjoys getting to know Terry, a Trotskyite, who becomes dismayed when the famous director Matthew Pyke chooses Karim over him for a new production. After that, Pyke invites Karim to perform the show in New York. Once there, Karim seeks out Charlie, who has moved to America to be “two English boys in America, the land where music came from, with Mick Jagger, John Lennon and Johnny Rotten living around the corner” (Kureishi 249). Then, Karim returns back to London to find it a changed city, politically and aesthetically. “I walked around Central London and saw that the town is being ripped apart; the rotten is being replaced by the new, and the new is ugly. The gift of creating beauty had been lost somewhere. The ugliness is in the people, too. Londoners seemed to hate each other” (Kureishi 258). Karim, then, finds a job in a television soap opera.
The novel ends on the day Thatcher is elected the new Prime Minister. Karim invites his father, Haroon, and Eva, his brother, Allie, Allie’s new girlfriend, and his friends Changez and to the most expensive restaurant he knows in Soho. (Is too busy with politics and the baby to join them (World Literature and Its Times).