American colonies had always remained loyal to Mother England until the French and Indian war took place

American colonies had always remained loyal to Mother England until the French and Indian war took place. But this war cannot be fully to blame for the colonists sudden change in loyalty, as the colonies had experienced other changes to their daily life. The colonists loyalty to England switched because of the ideas brought forth through the Enlightenment, the Great Awakening and the French and Indian War.
In the eighteenth century, there was a shift of beliefs and thinking called the Enlightenment, that caused people to question their old ways. The Enlightenment was lead by Englishmen Thomas Hobbes and Francis Bacon and Frenchman Renee Descartes (among many others), who helped completely change colonist’s way of thinking (Enlightenment). People started to change their religious beliefs and focus their thinking in believing things that are backed by science and reason instead of blind faith. Now that the colonists had questioned their faith in religious beliefs, they also questioned their loyalty towards English rule, and this played a huge role with regards to the colonists wanting to be independent from Great Britain.
The Great Awakening took place in the 1730s and 1740s and was a religious revival that renewed the Christian faith, but in a different way. This movement taught that all people are born sinners and that if they confessed their sins to God, they will be saved. The Great Awakening focused more on a personal relationship with God, instead of the formal ways they were used to. Because of this new way of thinking, it split the colonists into two groups called old lights, who focused more on the old, traditional way of religion, and new lights, who took the new ideas of the Great Awakening and applied it to their lives.